Navigating Resilience

Welcome to the Resilience Navigation Portal

This website is designed to support neighborhoods, families and individuals in Austin to find information about emergency weather response that is most important and relevant to you and your family. Whether you are planning ahead for extreme weather or dealing with it right now, we hope you can find what you need here. Please help us keep improving by giving us your input with this feedback form.
This page is produced by Community Resilience Trust (CRT). When weather is really severe and when possible, CRT creates virtual space where organizers can coordinate responses with each other and sometimes with the city and county. When there is extreme weather and we are active, you will see it a section towards the top of this page.
You can use the menu at the top of the page to find your way. The accessibility button to the left will help you adjust for any disabilities. Many pages have ASL videos, family-friendly videos, and graphics with more pictures and less text. At the footer is the language tab where you can adjust the language in which you view this page
[NOTE TO CLIMATE NAVIGATORS: YOU WILL SEE A SAMPLE ALERT BELOW. THE ALERT AND SITUATION ASSESSMENT LINKED IN THE SECTION IS BASED ON HEAT EARLIER IN THE WEEK AND IN REALITY, IS NO LONGER ACTIVE]
Sunset background. Free public domain CC0 photo.
HEAT PAGE

ACTIVE EVENT:
EXTREME HEAT

Weather.gov shows that temperatures inside a car will reach 100° in 25 minutes. Cracking a window helps a little, but even with a cracked window, in 90° the car interior can reach a dangerous 110° in 10 minutes and reach over 130° in under 50 minutes.

How much water should you drink when outside in the heat? It varies by body weight, but there are some general guidelines. The CDC recommends that when working in the heat, people drink about one quart of water per hour. The US Army utilizes a work/rest and water intake chart that shows varying recommendations by heat category. Similar to the CDC, the chart recommends that while doing easy work on a day with extreme heat (above 90°), 1 quart per hour is recommended. This leaves us with at least 2 gallons of water per day per individual.

Austin regularly designates certain libraries and rec centers as cooling centers throughout the summer. The map can be found here.

Cool showers can help lower body temperature quickly.

Loose, lightweight clothing helps keep the body ventilated and cool.

Ovens can continue to emit extra heat hours after use.

Wearing a hat can help avoid moisture loss and also share the face and hear, where heat can be lost.

Elderly individuals, children, and those with chronic illnesses are particularly susceptible to the effects of heat and may suffer from delayed health issues like dehydration or heat exhaustion. Ensure those affected by heat-related illnesses receive proper medical care. This might include hydration therapy, treatment for heatstroke, or regular health check-ups in the days following the heat wave.

Use a big fan in your attic to help push out the hot air and cool down your house.

Extreme Heat

Winter Storms

Drought

Hurricanes

Severe Storms

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